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Gloucestershire Business News

Students turn to technology with university choices

The latest university and college application and acceptance figures from UCAS show the continued popularity of STEM subjects shows no sign of waning.

Acceptances to computer science courses have risen by almost 50 per cent (from 20,420 in 2011 to 30,090 in 2020); and acceptances to engineering courses are up 21 per cent from 25,995 in 2011 to 31,545 in 2020.

Acceptances to the newer artificial intelligence (AI) courses have seen a 400 per cent jump in the past decade (from just 65 in 2011 to 355 in 2020).

Julia Adamson, director of education at BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT said: "A growing and diverse pipeline of talent in computer science and AI is essential for the UK's economic recovery and its global competitiveness. The establishment of the National Centre for Computing Education (NCCE) is giving more young people a positive experience of computing at school and helping to create demand for the subject at degree level and beyond.

"AI degrees will attract a wider range of students than ever, as AI becomes essential to solving ethical challenges in every sector of the economy and society."

Other trends in today's release of data show:

• Nursing demand remains strong. Despite the removal of NHS bursaries in 2017, demand for nursing places is now almost at the same level seen in 2011 (62,920 applicants made a nursing choice in 2020 compared to 63,275 in 2011) and acceptances have grown by 57 per cent - representing an additional 13,635 students.

• With the expansion of medical places in the last few years, acceptances to medicine courses are at the highest level on record, growing 37 per cent since 2017.

• Law increased from 22,720 acceptances in 2011 to 29,105 acceptances in 2020.

• Business increased from 61,100 acceptances in 2011 to 75,515 in 2020.

• Psychology acceptances increase from 16,685 in 2011 to 26,200 in 2020.

• Humanities subjects have decreased in popularity over the last decade. English studies have seen a decrease from 10,020 acceptances in 2011 to 6,980 this year in 2020, and history and philosophical studies from 15,060 in 2011 to 12,870.

A significant decline in language subjects is a concern. For a post-Brexit Britain, the need for languages is likely to remain strong, yet acceptances to modern language degree courses have decreased by 36 per cent - from 6,005 in 2011 to 3,830 in 2020. This drop in demand is seen alongside a decrease in language A Level entrants over the same timeframe.

Clare Marchant, chief executive at UCAS, said: "There are a lot of factors that go into what subjects students choose. It is pleasing to see that they are responding to economic cues with increased demand for subjects like engineering and, inspired by the work of the NHS, with more mature applicants and 18 year olds applying for nursing.

"The decline in accepts to languages could exacerbate the languages skills gap in the wake of Brexit, therefore it is important that action is taken to promote the benefits of languages across the education sector."

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